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Genetically Engineered, Low-Lactose Dairy calf Bred in China

Summary posted by Meridian on 6/11/2012

Source: Xinhua (11 June 2012)

Author(s): n/a

Researchers at Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in northern China say they have developed the first genetically modified (GM) calf that will be able to produce low-lactose milk. Nearly sixty percent of people in China are said to suffer from lactose intolerance, symptoms of which range from rashes to diarrhea and other digestive disorders. In May 2011, a research team at Inner Mongolia Agricultural University extracted fetus fibroblasts from a pregnant Holstein cow and genetically modified the fetuses by introducing a gene for a lactose dissolution enzyme. "The enzyme can dissolve lactose -- the main sugar found in dairy products -- into galactose or glucose to ease digestive disorders among the lactose-intolerant people," says researcher Zhang Li. The GM fetus was then transplanted into the womb of a cow in July, and the resulting calf, named Lakes, was born about nine months later, Zhang reports. The article can be viewed online at the link below.

The original article may still be available at http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2012-06/11/c_131645355.htm

As tagged by Meridian Institute:

Stakeholders: Academia

Regions: Asia

Topics: Product developmentRisks and benefits: human health

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