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Meridian Institute staff worked with the US Forest Service and the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments on an effort to build more constructive relationships and address several outstanding issues between the Forest Service and local governments in Colorado’s Blue River watershed (home of Meridian’s...
​Meridian Institute worked closely with program staff at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation to support their exploration of a potential strategy for reducing the production and consumption of oil in North America. Meridian conducted extensive interviews, including with experts in transportation...
The Mimbres Watershed is located in southwestern New Mexico. Grazing, dredge mining, removal of riparian vegetation, and streambank modification have resulted in water-quality impairments. In support of Total Maximum Daily Load implementation by the State of New Mexico Environment Department (to comply...
New Mexico’s Jemez River and its tributaries have experienced significant impairment due to soil erosion, which is thought to have resulted from a variety of natural and other activities such as grazing, recreation, stream bank modification, removal of riparian vegetation, silviculture, road construction...
The Upper Rio Grande Watershed is located in north central New Mexico, bordering Colorado. The watershed includes several urban areas, including Taos. Several stream segments were not meeting water-quality standards as a result of a broad range of (past and present) human activities in the watershed....
The San Antonio and Los Pinos Rivers and their tributaries in Northern New Mexico have experienced significant impairment due to soil erosion, which is thought to have resulted from natural and other activities such as grazing, recreation, stream bank modification, removal of riparian vegetation, silviculture,...
Significant increases in mining, tourism, recreation, and second-home development over the past few decades are thought to have contributed to heavy metals, sediment, and nutrient loadings, along with low pH levels, throughout many reaches of the Red River watershed in New Mexico. In support of Total...
The Cimarron Watershed in New Mexico has experienced significant nonpoint source pollution, stemming from recreation and tourism development as well as runoff from forests, private ranch land, and range land. In support of Total Maximum Daily Load implementation by the State of New Mexico's Environment...
Water quality in New Mexico’s Rio Chama and a number of its tributaries has been influenced by agricultural uses, atmospheric deposition, dredging, forest management practices, highway maintenance and runoff, mining, natural sources, onsite wastewater systems, present and historic grazing, recreation,...
Extensive ranching and range land management, along with resource extraction and urban development, are thought to have contributed to water quality degradation throughout much of the San Juan Watershed in New Mexico. In support of Total Maximum Daily Load implementation by the State of New Mexico Environment...